SANDANUS ART

In his paintings, Miroslav Sandanus captures the feelings of several members of the younger generation facing the gradually unfolding crises. Not only through his themes, but also through the chosen perspectives and techniques used, he thematizes the fragmentation, opacity and randomness of the contemporary world.

He intuitively started thinking about contemporary polycrisis during his studies. In the past he thematized the landscape’s overload with waste in a series of landfills, rubbish dumps, and advertising spaces that captured the multiplicity of the production of goods and its promotion in a kaleidoscopic way. He enhanced this impression with collage and assemblage entries that expanded the painterly language with fragments of real recycled mass production. Although the ecological and climatic lineage of his works is strong, it is not the only defining one. It can be seen as a consequence, but he was looking for a deeper cause. 

He was revealing a focus on the process of buying, not only from the position of the consumer, but of the whole economy, which is built on the concept of the constant growth of consumption. In this period, he combined classical painting with dripping, pouring and running paint, or grinding down the individual layers of a painting.       

Through the prism of a man-altered landscape, Sandanus focuses on global climate change – the effects of storms, fire and melting glaciers depicted in the classical tradition of painting. He uses multiple layers of symbols, associations and narrative to paint a larger picture of the problem. One could say that his work to some extent follows the historical tradition of painting with a moral message – his concern is not only to point out, but also to influence the transformation of destructive patterns of individual and societal behavior that ultimately result in catastrophe. The latter may paradoxically be beautiful and aesthetically appealing, but a tense, almost apocalyptic atmosphere persists in the compositions and minute details.

The sketch of man in nature, an almost classical genre of painting, becomes an important part of his works and gradually becomes independent from it. Sandanus moves it into the present through clothing and poses. He is someone with whom we can identify because we are familiar with exactly the same sports jackets and trousers. The figures are often deliberately not looking directly into the face, averting their eyes or staring at the ground, their silhouette at times dissolving into the surroundings, at others glowing garishly.

In his latest work, he explores the roots of our anxiety. He finds it in the endless feed of sometimes contradictory information, isolation and lack of personal contact that the younger generation is experiencing thanks to the passing pandemic and a stronger concentration on online communication. It does not analyze the reasons, but looks at the emotional level of the impact on the individual. In doing so, he concentrates to a much greater extent than before on the individual, whose identity, however, remains anonymous, as in his previous works.

Sandanus illustrated the continuous flow of information by illuminating faces with blue or other colored light from electronic devices. The downward turns of the head cause even more confusion and uncertainty when looking at the portrait. The isolation, which is hardly visible, appears again in the subtle civilian metaphor of the raincoat, which separates the individual from the surroundings with a thin layer. Behind this screen, unbound fun and melancholy take place.

Miroslav Sandanus brings the medium of classical painting into the plane of contemporary generational anxiety by means of a subtly chosen language of composition, its psychological impact and archetypally perceived metaphors. The feeling of being lost and helpless in the face of massive forces that exceed our ability to influence them in any way, or even to contain them through perception, materialize in the form of the hyperobject, as defined by the British philosopher Timothy Morton. They are something that exceeds us in their scope and complexity. We cannot see them, we cannot understand them, but we feel that we are part of them. With this feeling, so new for a man who has inherited the modernist notion of an essentially total comprehensibility of the world, we must now learn to live.

2023

Jana Babušiaková

More

In his paintings, Miroslav Sandanus captures the feelings of several members of the younger generation facing the gradually unfolding crises. Not only through his themes, but also through the chosen perspectives and techniques used, he thematizes the fragmentation, opacity and randomness of the contemporary world.

He intuitively started thinking about contemporary polycrisis during his studies. In the past he thematized the landscape’s overload with waste in a series of landfills, rubbish dumps, and advertising spaces that captured the multiplicity of the production of goods and its promotion in a kaleidoscopic way. He enhanced this impression with collage and assemblage entries that expanded the painterly language with fragments of real recycled mass production. Although the ecological and climatic lineage of his works is strong, it is not the only defining one. It can be seen as a consequence, but he was looking for a deeper cause. He was revealing a focus on the process of buying, not only from the position of the consumer, but of the whole economy, which is built on the concept of the constant growth of consumption. In this period, he combined classical painting with dripping, pouring and running paint, or grinding down the individual layers of a painting.

Through the prism of a man-altered landscape, Sandanus focuses on global climate change – the effects of storms, fire and melting glaciers depicted in the classical tradition of painting. He uses multiple layers of symbols, associations and narrative to paint a larger picture of the problem. One could say that his work to some extent follows the historical tradition of painting with a moral message – his concern is not only to point out, but also to influence the transformation of destructive patterns of individual and societal behavior that ultimately result in catastrophe. The latter may paradoxically be beautiful and aesthetically appealing, but a tense, almost apocalyptic atmosphere persists in the compositions and minute details.

The sketch of man in nature, an almost classical genre of painting, becomes an important part of his works and gradually becomes independent from it. Sandanus moves it into the present through clothing and poses. He is someone with whom we can identify because we are familiar with exactly the same sports jackets and trousers. The figures are often deliberately not looking directly into the face, averting their eyes or staring at the ground, their silhouette at times dissolving into the surroundings, at others glowing garishly.

In his latest work, he explores the roots of our anxiety. He finds it in the endless feed of sometimes contradictory information, isolation and lack of personal contact that the younger generation is experiencing thanks to the passing pandemic and a stronger concentration on online communication. It does not analyze the reasons, but looks at the emotional level of the impact on the individual. In doing so, he concentrates to a much greater extent than before on the individual, whose identity, however, remains anonymous, as in his previous works.

Sandanus illustrated the continuous flow of information by illuminating faces with blue or other colored light from electronic devices. The downward turns of the head cause even more confusion and uncertainty when looking at the portrait. The isolation, which is hardly visible, appears again in the subtle civilian metaphor of the raincoat, which separates the individual from the surroundings with a thin layer. Behind this screen, unbound fun and melancholy take place.

Miroslav Sandanus brings the medium of classical painting into the plane of contemporary generational anxiety by means of a subtly chosen language of composition, its psychological impact and archetypally perceived metaphors. The feeling of being lost and helpless in the face of massive forces that exceed our ability to influence them in any way, or even to contain them through perception, materialize in the form of the hyperobject, as defined by the British philosopher Timothy Morton. They are something that exceeds us in their scope and complexity. We cannot see them, we cannot understand them, but we feel that we are part of them. With this feeling, so new for a man who has inherited the modernist notion of an essentially total comprehensibility of the world, we must now learn to live.

2023

Jana Babušiaková

More

In his paintings, Miroslav Sandanus captures the feelings of several members of the younger generation facing the gradually unfolding crises. Not only through his themes, but also through the chosen perspectives and techniques used, he thematizes the fragmentation, opacity and randomness of the contemporary world.

He intuitively started thinking about contemporary polycrisis during his studies. In the past he thematized the landscape’s overload with waste in a series of landfills, rubbish dumps, and advertising spaces that captured the multiplicity of the production of goods and its promotion in a kaleidoscopic way. He enhanced this impression with collage and assemblage entries that expanded the painterly language with fragments of real recycled mass production. Although the ecological and climatic lineage of his works is strong, it is not the only defining one. It can be seen as a consequence, but he was looking for a deeper cause. He was revealing a focus on the process of buying, not only from the position of the consumer, but of the whole economy, which is built on the concept of the constant growth of consumption. In this period, he combined classical painting with dripping, pouring and running paint, or grinding down the individual layers of a painting.

Through the prism of a man-altered landscape, Sandanus focuses on global climate change – the effects of storms, fire and melting glaciers depicted in the classical tradition of painting. He uses multiple layers of symbols, associations and narrative to paint a larger picture of the problem. One could say that his work to some extent follows the historical tradition of painting with a moral message – his concern is not only to point out, but also to influence the transformation of destructive patterns of individual and societal behavior that ultimately result in catastrophe. The latter may paradoxically be beautiful and aesthetically appealing, but a tense, almost apocalyptic atmosphere persists in the compositions and minute details.

The sketch of man in nature, an almost classical genre of painting, becomes an important part of his works and gradually becomes independent from it. Sandanus moves it into the present through clothing and poses. He is someone with whom we can identify because we are familiar with exactly the same sports jackets and trousers. The figures are often deliberately not looking directly into the face, averting their eyes or staring at the ground, their silhouette at times dissolving into the surroundings, at others glowing garishly.

In his latest work, he explores the roots of our anxiety. He finds it in the endless feed of sometimes contradictory information, isolation and lack of personal contact that the younger generation is experiencing thanks to the passing pandemic and a stronger concentration on online communication. It does not analyze the reasons, but looks at the emotional level of the impact on the individual. In doing so, he concentrates to a much greater extent than before on the individual, whose identity, however, remains anonymous, as in his previous works.

Sandanus illustrated the continuous flow of information by illuminating faces with blue or other colored light from electronic devices. The downward turns of the head cause even more confusion and uncertainty when looking at the portrait. The isolation, which is hardly visible, appears again in the subtle civilian metaphor of the raincoat, which separates the individual from the surroundings with a thin layer. Behind this screen, unbound fun and melancholy take place.

Miroslav Sandanus brings the medium of classical painting into the plane of contemporary generational anxiety by means of a subtly chosen language of composition, its psychological impact and archetypally perceived metaphors. The feeling of being lost and helpless in the face of massive forces that exceed our ability to influence them in any way, or even to contain them through perception, materialize in the form of the hyperobject, as defined by the British philosopher Timothy Morton. They are something that exceeds us in their scope and complexity. We cannot see them, we cannot understand them, but we feel that we are part of them. With this feeling, so new for a man who has inherited the modernist notion of an essentially total comprehensibility of the world, we must now learn to live.

2023

Jana Babušiaková

More
Palác výstava